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the world. there are a lot of questions, too. the sharing economy waits to be shaped by policy. it is in its adolescence. this is a transformative moment. it is waiting to be shaped by policy, but for whose benefit? we believe it should be shaped for the benefit of as many people as possible, and especially for those who need it the most. . we also need new regulations, not simply application of the old. otherwise, the sharing economy will fail to meet its promises. 30 of things that are the biggest threats to our society. i will open a panel -- there are two things i think are the biggest threats to our society. i will give you a high level brief of the sharing economy. there is no textbook definition of the sharing economy. we will then begin the panel discussion which will last for 45 minutes or an hour, however long you want it to last. before i dived in here, raise your hand if you are familiar with at least one of these books. i highly recommend all of them. the one on the end is coming out in may. "share or die" -- i do not recommend that for marketing, but for a cause, we're trying t
discussed impact any of the schering economy companies. you could also see opportunities to educate the public or just gain awareness for the services through the city and existing programs. >> i forgot to repeat the question, but the question is -- what regulations to the company's what? >> that is a great question. we would love the city to educate themselves and help educate the rest of san francisco about what this is and defined it is something -- as something that is not a hotel. and create regulations tailored specifically to this activity and make sure that this definition and these regulations are applied consistently in the tax code, the administrative code, and the planning code, to make sure there is some coherence about how the activity is treated and regulated. >> i mentioned earlier, running around doing deliveries. some sort of collaborative consumption, schering economy parking permit, parking pass along those lines would be very helpful, as well as just generating awareness here in other cities -- for instance new york city -- the mayor did endorse utilizing compan
the 21st century. the growth the economy we are moving out of hopefully cannot do that. it is what got us into the jam we are in now. you are probably very familiar with the whitney we hear all the time. we're using 40% more resources annually than the earth can replenish. we're draining our natural capital. there has been 15 years of sustainable development with development of new green technologies. in 2011, we have the largest out of carbon ever. inequality has reached epic proportions around the world. in the united states, the richest 1% owned 38% of all wealth. the bottom 90% hold 73% of all debt. we are wiping out the planet and the public is left holding the bag. we definitely need something completely different. putting the moral outrage aside for a second, this situation also puts cities at great risk. we've only gotten a taste of the destruction that -- disruption as possible with the numerous revolutions that broke out. the crisis will land hardest in cities. i see city's borrowing language from complexity theory, i see the boys and a critical state. it is a new situati
on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in it because it has aspects that have piqued our interest, about hoour environment, how to improve life for more people, how to make an expensive city more affordable to more people, how to utilize the strengths of the city as a great tourist city. how we can get more folks to come and experience the wonders of the city. maybe they will make their stake here. these panel members have decided to make their stake here. they risked reputation, may be small amounts of money. if they had a lot of money, they may not have had to start this. they have also done it for the right reasons. they want to experience the city in a different way, but one that is in the tradition of san francisco and is reflective of mine, welcoming more people to share in the economy. hopefully the right reasons will create more jobs and get more entrepreneurs involved. i have often said this can be the city for the 100%. everybody can have a chance to fulfill their dreams and make sure they can have a stable income for themselves and their families. i think we are on the
code is really segmented largely for personal and business taxes. the sharing economy presents a nuanced situation. individuals are not businesses but are enjoying a new stream of income. we are interested in having that conversation in a way where we can use the new economy to benefit the city as well as individuals who are proactively taking all entrepreneurship in their own hands to leverage their own resources and knowledge to supplement their income. >> at task rabbit, we're looking to partner with the city and generate more awareness around what we do and how consumers and small businesses can get involved. we have a lot of small businesses utilizing the network as a delivery force or on demand labor force, particularly with seasonal businesses. they do not want to have to hire a bunch of full-time employees for a month or two of work. they're able to utilize the task private network to scale up and down. another case we see is for deliveries. suzy cakes uses task rabbit to get her goodies out. these tasks rabbits are using their own vehicles to do the deliveries. it is t
. the sharing economy presents a nuanced situation. individuals are not businesses but are enjoying a new stream of income. we are interested in having that conversation in a way where we can use the new economy to benefit the city as well as individuals who are proactively taking all entrepreneurship in their own hands to leverage their own resources and knowledge to supplement their income. >> at task rabbit, we're looking to partner with the city and generate more awareness around what we do and how consumers and small businesses can get involved. we have a lot of small businesses utilizing the network as a delivery force or on demand labor force, particularly with seasonal businesses. they do not want to have to hire a bunch of full-time employees for a month or two of work. they're able to utilize the task private network to scale up and down. another case we see is for deliveries. suzy cakes uses task rabbit to get her goodies out. these tasks rabbits are using their own vehicles to do the deliveries. it is typically for a quick five-minute stop. one thing we have been brainstorming with t
, but an acknowledgment of the work that lies ahead. we understand that this is a global economy. the opportunities are ones that we can only surpassed if we come together. we can win the future if we dream together, if we work together. as a society, as an economy, the best is yet to comment. let me leave you with this last idea. every moment affords us an opportunity to change the world. let's seize that moment in each and every moment that succeeds that moment and let's do that together in celebration of our asian-pacific heritage and recognition of the great heritage as all the people that make up san francisco and california. we will truly honored this month, our heritage and our future. thank you very much. [applause] >> ok. all right. we have some competition on the stage right now. >> a couple of other people we need to thank. we have a bunch of co-hosts, the san francisco board of supervisors. a round of applause, please. [applause] our event shares and co-chairs. [reading names] >> all right, thank you. [applause] >> those people give money, so please applaud. >> next, i would like to int
counted as another job in the economy. so, you're right. it's important when you try to use this data to understand exactly what's in it, it's very gross measure. more importantly for us, we're sort of following the trend up or down. >> along those same lines, you start going into different professions and job descriptions and you do per capita income. again, it's important to know if someone is, you know, a single employer because oftentimes some of the lower paying jobs will be the fact that you may be getting the data from one of these jobs, not the multiple jobs that are -- because of the nature of the work it lends itself to having different employers. another thing i came up with here was the transportation piece. and i saw a huge number rider ship on the san bruno lines and historically the geary line was always the heaviest and the judah line for the light rail which remained real heavy, but i'm sort of surprised why the san bruno lines were as heavy as they are and that might be something we really want to look at for the future to see if there's anyway -- i know we'll have t
city with all these events and at the same time we're creating jobs and we're making sure our economy is boosting at the same time. we've been very successful at creating conditions to make sure that our investors and our entrepreneurs in this city maintain their investor confidence, allowing them to innovate, to grow and to create jobs. and whether they are a neighborhood or a small business or an international clean tech company or new technology company, they've got investor confidence in our city. we're also creating investor confidence because we have in working closely with our controller and all the other financial organizations of our city and all of our departments, we're now on a more financially stable responsible path. we've done our pension reform, it's not 100 percent, we've gt a big chunk of it down and we're going to continue doing the smart things to make sure that pension is solid. and we've got structural reforms in our budget as well. we passed our first two-year budget. that's a wonderful accomplishment, one that i'm interested in to continue it make sure we
. that's important in the economies of scale and fighting the inevitable battle with the opponent, the competitor. the other thing i didn't get to talk in the previous item that was alarming to us right now what staff is telling us is that their intention is to always have the commercial customers be an opt in. and in mirren they did not do it that way. they included commercial customers recently in their full opt out process. in san francisco most of the energy is used by commercial customers. we will not be able to achieve that big beautiful build-out that we're planning without those commercial customers being put into an opt out so enough of them stay in to get the bonding ability and the economies of scale to make sure that we can do the full build out and hire the thousands of people, et cetera. thanks. >> you said that marin opt in? >> no, marin, they did their initial thing a couple of years ago. they just completed their enrollment and enrolled all of their customers a few months ago, and that included commercial customers who were then able to opt out if they wanted to.
, recognize that perhaps it is i little difficult time for not only the economy in general, but for the small business owners. it is not my intent to ever totally wave a penalty, based upon the law and program, but i... maybe for thanksgiving, i am willing to reduce it the penalty. i would like to reduce it to 15 days. >> i am a little torn too because there was an infraction and i think that there needs to be some penalty for that. i also know that this is their livelihood and i would be enclined to go lower, 10 days. 14 days, is that? would you do 15. >> i said 15. >> then, i am okay with that. >> thinking about work weeks. just state for the record, on principle, i believe that 25 days is an appropriate penalty. i understand that it is the first time offense, and that the department has up to imposed up to 90 days. selling to minors is a problem. and i think that my understanding is that the type of enforcement has been actually effective in deterring this type of conduct. notwithstanding the fact that i do agree that it is difficult for a small business owners to manage suspensions of thi
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
and employment are put farther out of reach because of a felony conviction, especially in a down economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can show that drug use rates are quite similar in all different ethnic communities and african-americans are 13 times greater likelihood of being convicted of a felony of simple possession. then of course there's also the savings that we could experience, nonpartisan, independent legislative analyst office has determined that there would be $159 million annually of savings at the county level, plus another $65 million annually in savings at the state level. and our bill would direct a portion of that savings to drug treatment programs so that we can, like these 13 other states, have better outcomes, safer communities. i of course have to thank the sponsors of our bill, and we have
colleague scott wiener for helping to showcase the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be renowned for. and those of you that work in our bars and clubs, i want to make sure that we are trading the
together and focus on a larger goal, that winning means generations of kids win. our economy wins. what i think are things that we do well. all of so many other aspects of our society win out when we use these opportunities and invite a lot more to come together and think creatively as we are the innovation capital of the world. we will continue to do that and continue to invite more partners to be our partners in this great event. go sf super bowl! [applause] >> mayor lee, it is an honor to be chairing this committee. we won't be able to do this without you so thank you for your support today. we have a lot of folks around us. and one silverstein. [ laughter] >> all about rich. i just want to say thank you to the team at goodby silverstein, the social media campaign. you have worked incredibly hard. rich, your team is amazing. come up here and tell everybody about the logo and the campaign. [applause] >> we have to win this. we are not in it to come in second. we've got to win it. i challenge anyone to have better looking goal posts than that. we have remarkable area. we have a great gro
people together and focus on a larger goal, that winning means generations of kids win. our economy wins. what i think are things that we do well. all of so many other aspects of our society win out when we use these opportunities and invite a lot more to come together and think creatively as we are the innovation capital of the world. we will continue to do that and continue to invite more partners to be our partners in this great event. go sf super bowl! [applause] >> mayor lee, it is an honor to be chairing this committee. we won't be able to do this without you so thank you for your support today. we have a lot of folks around us. and one silverstein. [ laughter] >> all about rich. i just want to say thank you to the team at goodby silverstein, the social media campaign. you have worked incredibly hard. rich, your team is amazing. come up here and tell everybody about the logo and the campaign. [applause] >> we have to win this. we are not in it to come in second. we've got to win it. i challenge anyone to have better looking goal posts than that. we have remarkable area. we have a g
is it an incubator in the government. it is not to incubate the economy, it is to execute projects and it is actually... (inaudible) program and the present priorities. one such program that is really focused up to date is presidential innovations for... shall we go through... okay. so, then and as an effort that, really have the idea for, basically made... and the whole idea is an amazing... and the government to work with all of the innovators on game-changing that they can actually move forward and... money, and improve it in the lives of americans. and the idea is that the teams work in (inaudible) in part of and deliver... within six months. and so not as a... powerpoint or... actual out come and actual change. and they are... the american people. what we actually did was in the version of a traditional (inaudible) and actually... what we did instead was the ground force from within the government a set of... funded by agencies that did (inaudible) external folks to come in and help. in fact, people competed for the right to pay for both. they were actually going to fund (inaudible). we actually
to support the innovation economy in the united states. we are looking to produce better and new jobs and position to ensure that america remains at the forefront of the economy in the 21st century. we are working to ensure that all americans have the resources and the skills necessary to fully share in all of the possibilities, civic, social, and economic. all of these made possible by the internet. that is one of the reasons we are here today. he discovered for the administration is the broadband technology opportunities program or btop. this program was established in 2009 by the american reinvestment and recovery act and is administered by ntia. we have nearly $4 billion invested in roughly 230 projects across the country, all aimed at expanding broadband access and adoption in the country. and i want to tell you a little bit about the programs and then tell you about why we care so much about this issue. so, we have the btop for infrastructure projects. these are building broadband networks in areas that are currently underserved. they are making sure that hospitals, schools, and
the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of. please welcome our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom. >> my role was to get tom to speak. i'm just going to jump in because i want to keep you all on time. you've got an agenda packet and i'm going to be held accountable if you don't meet it. roslyn, let's pick up on tom's passion. he told me a couple points that are important, that is the consciousness awareness, this growing consciousness around bullying. and it's a question i guess that requires, has bullying gotten worse or have we gotten better to begin to recognize it? >> hard to know. tom and the president refer to as far too often as a rite of passage. we certainly are seeing evidence in ways that i don't recall, the levels of violence, the vitriolic violence, it's not just coming from the back of the school, it's coming at home, social media, you are i
economy. our customer, i can completely agree with what shannon said in terms of our business objective, so to speak, is to empower entrepreneurs and innovators, to create jobs. that's a metric of success, not revenue generated per data set or some other per ifervance metric. the other piece of that looking back to the example of weather and gps, my monetization, is that together they contribute $100 billion to the american economy last year. last year alone from just those two data liberations. so, that is the way in which we are approaching from a strategy perspective, the ultimate impact to our customers. >> one super quick. one thing the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities have smaller budgets. having a structure to support all this open data takes a lot of money. so, when these small cities are thinking about this, they should think about a way of somehow equalizing because they are putting into having these open data team, right? so, what does make sense? this is kind of an open question to get your point of view. >> do y
newsom's energetic leadership the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of. please welcome our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom. >> my role was to get tom to speak. i'm just going to jump in because i want to keep you all on time. you've got an agenda packet and i'm going to be held accountable if you don't meet it. roslyn, let's pick up on tom's passion. he told me a couple points that are important, that is the consciousness awareness, this growing consciousness around bullying. and it's a question i guess that requires, has bullying gotten worse or have we gotten better to begin to recognize it? >> hard to know. tom and the president refer to as far too often as a rite of passage. we certainly are seeing evidence in ways that i don't recall, the levels of violence, the vitriolic violence, it's not just coming from the back of the school, it's c
economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can show that drug use rates are quite similar in all different ethnic communities and african-americans are 13 times greater likelihood of being convicted of a felony of simple possession. then of course there's also the savings that we could experience, nonpartisan, independent legislative analyst office has determined that there would be $159 million annually of savings at the county level, plus another $65 million annually in savings at the state level. and our bill would direct a portion of that savings to drug treatment programs so that we can, like these 13 other states, have better outcomes, safer communities. i of course have to thank the sponsors of our bill, and we have a number of them, the h.l.u. which has been a champion and the drug policy alliance as we
on an economy of scale, you know, go with organic with the ones that have the highest levels of pesticides. our website has a link to those tips so i can show you where that would be. and now we're going to pop into the living room and talk about flame retardants which are an important issue for any firefighters who are working in the field because it's those burns that are going to create exposures, so as folks in the home are thinking about that, once they found that frequent hand washing can reduce the actual levels of these flame retardants because we touch them, they get on our hands, they're in household dusts and make their way into our bodies, so washing them off our hands can reduce exposures, using a vak coupe with a hepa filter and a big move that could come down the pike is going down to legacy fabrics like wool and fabric that don't require the use of these mraim retardants at all and burn much more slowly, this's been some amazing videos that you can look at that you may have seen that show the legacy fabrics burning so much more slowly than the flame retardant treated ones, so th
, but these three principles. mastery, been technically proficient in your area. it is economy, where you are able to take initiative, operate within a zone that has been broad enough for you to use your creativity. it is purpose. purpose on behalf of the people of san francisco. i think all of the nominees that we are honoring tonight are motivated by these principles. i want to thank the department heads who have employed them. they allow these people to flourish, to be an autonomous, and move forward in a way that benefits the people of san francisco. we think the best and brightest should be in city government. the people here tonight are proof that they are. finally, i want to mention a very meaningful thing for me to be here tonight on the night we are giving a lifetime of work to ed harrington. [applause] when i arrived in san francisco coming out of state employment some six years ago or so, ed was very generous in giving me advice. to say -- i will call. why are we doing this? who can i ask this question of? if i think it may have political implications or just to bounce it off him, he al
to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can
three days a week. one of the most important things they do is learning about the new economy and engage with the latest web and mobile technologies and they bring in entrepreneurers as guest speakers and share the work they're doing in our communities today and their career path and how technology influenced their lives so to spark america and the martinez brothers and others we thank you for your service. [applause] >> the next awardees will be recognized for their contributions in the field of business. to make this presentation we would like to invite to the stage the honorable from mexico mr. corona . [applause] >> jenny florez is the director -- i'm sorry. would you join us at the stage. [applause] jenny is a community development director of city northern california. she is responsible for the community development, investment in the community -- community redevelopment act program and making sure that under served communities in the marketplace have access to financial services and products. prior to her position with citi she served with the congress of california
with or the collaborative. one of the parties for our office was to ensure with the growing job economy many of the residents benefited from this as well. zen dust took this to heart and hired two summer intens in the neighborhood and i know them personally and live in the affordable housing developments and two young people part of veetnies center and they walked a couple of blocks from the home to new tech companies in midmarket where they were getting trained and employed and a new growing sector for me was particularly heart warming. zen dust collaborated with the community services and in the audience and work with chef programs that they catered all of their work events and supported the effort of several of our groups to cultivate more community gardens in the tenderloin. we want to see more of this. the city cultivated an environment where tech companies can thrive but with with the thing that they would give back and i want to commend them for setting the standards that are moving in and we have several agreements that are about to be signed before the end the year. it is clear
for outdoor fairs and festivals, which we know contribute mightily to our economy. i'm very committed to seeing the planning department put together an entertainment element of the planning code, so that we can understand and keep in mind that we do not do things, for example -- adopt the western some of plan that will put too much housing on the street. housing always beats nightlife. it always does. we have a plan for that. we need to rationalize our fees and scott street closers system, which is not serving the city, in my view. we need to repeal the archaic codes that undermine nightlife. and we need to continue to support our great state senator mark leno in its never-ending quest for a call at that locality. [applause] but we have to also keep in mind that this industry needs to be more and more organized in order to have the political organization as one supervisor, or two supervisors, there is only so much you can do. please come and get more organized. my colleagues, david and my colleagues need to hear from you. build an alliance with the business community. one of the bigge
of these events is a loss for san francisco culture and our economy. it will take the right perspective of leadership from the mayor's office to make those events be able to happen. >> [unintelligible] [applause] >> i am very sorry that we lost some of these events. i'm sure they added to cultural diversity. i do know that looking at the board, there are 280 events in a given year. street fairs, hip-hop, promotional events. there is only so much that we can do. we have to make sure that every event has enough personnel to keep it safe. be it the security plan, officers, or police officers. that is one thing i failed to mention earlier. paramount to training for an event that has enough people to prevent anything disastrous from occurring, you never know what can be prevented, because you never know what you can stop from happening. you never know if people have enough resources to make sure they do not have a problem. >> down to the last few questions, we are running out of time. >> let's see how quick we can get to it. >> ok. >> we will be really fast. i commend the police department.
, understand your business, talk to them as you are growing your business. when the economy is strong, all lenders are shopping for transactions. in times are tough on credit, you want to rely on those deeper liberation ships with your lender. you want to develop a relationship with a lender. it is the case where you want to open up an account, while to have another bank services that you want to have a relationship with your lender with it because when you go to them for any loan requests, you want them to know about your business and feel like they are a partner of yours, not just that you are shopping them. if you are shopping, you are just looking for the best deal from them, rather than a long- term relationship. >> i want to thank everyone for coming. hopefully, you have all signed up for our updates. we are going to be hosting these on a regular basis. the next two coming up will focus on becoming a government contractor, how your small business can partner with the government. the next one will also be on how to grain your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits ava
, a hotel desk employee, a politician, they go like this. economy of movement. that's their deal. traffic cop. been on the force a long time. new guy. the old veteran is going, dude, you'll wear out. it will take about two years and you'll want to retire. that's what happens. this t.s.a. kid, he's new, he goes like this. it's my turn to come through the metal detector, he's doing this. my first thought is that's a little overdone. this works. that's fine. i come through and i'm giggling, first thought wrong. it's quarter to 6:00 in the morning. something's funny? yeah. about i can't tell you what it is. he said, you've been selected for a special screening. i said, i've been chosen! you ever watch a homophobe's eyes roll back into his skull? that mental reset of the computer just blinks. i need male assist on two, please. i need a male assist on two. i don't care. this disease doesn't care, the criminal justice system doesn't care. g.o.d. doesn't care, heterosexual, you're perfect, bisexual, you're greedy, life is a buffet for you every day. i'll take one of him, two of her and all that b
of the city and the economy, i think we had two buildings that closed that have inclusionary requirements and it was not significant. we had a few ownership units, a few rental units and that's it. this year it looks like we'll have 12 buildings close, maybe 60 -- maybe more, about 40 ownership units and a lot of rental units. we have about 60. rental program is starting to outpace our ownership program which is in sync with what's happening in san francisco. many developer are choosing to receiptction -- rent for a period of time. that's addressed in the manual as well. what do we do for buyers, owners and developers who are building ownership units? first, we updated and clarified -- i'm just following along the memo that was provided with your packet. and if you need a copy, i have extras here. first we updated and clarified a lot of the -- many of our financing rules, including require choirtion a loan for your approval before someone applies for a unit. that's supposed to help make sure that qualified buyers are buying but also developers can be reassured their units will sell in a
. but anyway, given that barrier is there. and there could be economies of scale, i assume. i'm not a developer. it's too bad that we have this kind of situation arise. another question is going to be a dumb question. the redevelopment agency did own schlage lock site ; is that correct, no? >> no, actually most of the site was owned by -- my goodness, i'm forgetting this. ingersoll-rand, by the ingersoll-rand corporation. a small part was owned by [speaker not understood] as part of the agreement over the contamination of the site ask clean up of the site, ingersoll-rand's portion was transferred. so, they are the owners of schlage lock. [speaker not understood] if the redevelopment plan was fulfilled and the site was dedicated for affordable housing. that would be the only way they would come into ownership. >> and just on the bay lands issue, do you think you would ask john switke to attend one of our presentations? >> yes. we can tie our presentation to you with the release of the draft e. i. -i-r that is coming out in brisbane. i would emphasize that staff in brisbane has been excellent at
, if you want to compete in the global economy tomorrow, pal, you've got to embrace diversity. why does coca-cola write a brief to the united states supreme court and general motors and microsoft on issues of diversity and higher education? because they know if they want to get ahead, they've got to embrace that diversity. if they want to continue to be a fortunes 50 company, there's got to embrace diversity. similarly if we want to get down to the local level and address this issue, we've got to teach our kids that the sooner that you embrace difference and understand that your muslim classmate or your seat classmate or your gay classmate or your limited english professor classmate might be tomorrow's ceo or today's best friend of yours, the better off we will be. you have a leg up, having done about 30 jury trials across this country and seen interactions between people of diverse backgrounds. >> and here we try to celebrate, not just embrace, our diversity. celebrate all our interesting diversity but also celebrate the things that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum nee
this is important, in the midst of crazy budgets and real chaos due to the bad economy and some of the massive cuts the schools have endured, this is so important because a student can't learn, we know, a student can't learn if they are fearful. they will skip school, they will not come or when they are there they are not able to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have
all of the resources. that what is takes to build the economy for the 31st century and that's what these grants are all b it's a pleasure to you here with you. >> >> [applause] >> thank you and thank you to our hud partners and at this moment i know i don't need to introduce him. i want to present to all of you mayor edwin lee. >> thank you henry and thank you deputy administrator henry for being here today. two fantastic planning grants from hud as part of a intense national competition and the reason we got this nod is the people decided they're going to come together and get this done. this is a choice. this is a choice that we made with our residents here that we're going to better ourselves. we're going to lift ourselves up. we're going to do it together. that's what it means. that's why the housing authority is here because they believe in the same thing. i want to thank the commissioners and staff and henry a fantastic job and all the leadership with all of the commissioners. i want to thank our partners. let 300,000 grants and they reflect the deputy administrator a
our economy, and there will be more work to be done. i would like to hand over the podium to nicole rivera, who put this together. she will introduce the panelists and go over some logistics. i want to point out quickly that we are being recorded by san francisco government tv. the camera in front is only aimed at the podium. it is not taking shots of the audience, only the podium for people who want to ask questions. so do not worry, you are not on tv if you do not want to be. >> thank you for your patience. i am a representative with leader pelosi, and i'm thrilled to have you today to learn more of our best practices for accessing credit. it is a priority for our office. we are very well aware of how small businesses are running up against the wall right now in terms of trying to get the credit and loans they are looking for, so i will try hard to bring the brightest minds in this room so you can effectively fix their range and learn more about what you can do better to fix your business plan and what it is they are looking for. first of all, i will introduce everyone. mark quinn
years where salary costs go down because of labor concessions and helpfulness in a bad economy. >> i think within the typesful things that rates pay for, the easiest to explain are bond issues. especially if it's a bond issue like the bond that were approved by the voters, you asked us to do it, you gave them monies, we promised to repay the loans that we have taken out. that's why your rate went up by this amount. that's very ease toy explain. it buys you seismic safety and reliability. that is an easy explanation to give. the hardest one to give is within operating. operating funds, so many things, some big, some small, that is just hard to explain it. now, if we start from a position that we want to keep things as loud as we can and provide explanations as to the forces, if any, that drive you above that, then i think that goes a long wail to completing an understandable story as to why rates have to be what they have to be. >> what form do you want this to take? >> i will move this as an amendment to the policy that is in front of you. >> i was just going to ask you to read it ag
thing you know, they'll beiîtx streets dealing with an undergroundmj ñ and underground economy is live andó÷h]ww'í well. we ask you to not only just think about th% as jobs is ñ?ñ? concerned, but put a jobsgó6zcgççñ?ñ? program in the community that you can get them ready for(ñ?ñ?ñúzh it. that's after they get cleaned up. so i'm not saying that everybody's out there on drugsïk&c"p% no. there's some folks out there that really want a job, but they can't get]i l% one. we can't whistle past the graveyard no"7pk3ym#lñ?ñ? more. they are awake and they know that you're coming out ñ?ñ?ñ? third street and you know they comingí÷ñ?ñ?ñ out third street. but if they can qualify for a job you're5u5kdv about to cripple thisivñ?ñ? community and gentrification will set in.pnñ?ñ? so we ask you to please help the community. thank you. >> president torres: thankn:ñ?ñ? you. well put. any further public ñ?ñ? comments? >> eric brooks representingk÷ñ?ñ? san francisco green party and theri5fgwb local grassroot
seen economic growth in other business sectors as well in the economy. and what that means is oftentimes we have more visitors at our hotels and those hotels use more water as well as the restaurants. this translates to more water water treatment as water goes down the drain and down the toilet and that is good news on the wastewater side as well. where warmer weather doesn't necessarily help us, in weaker power cells because there's less hide generation as the water comes down the hill so we have a slight shortfall in our power enterprise. the next slide here provides for you one of the fund balance reserves, basically at beginning and ending checking account balances and what you have planned. in the water department we're nearly doubling our reserves from the end of last year to what is prkd projected. the wastewater department is up slightly, very similar to plan. and then in hetch hetchy water and power reserves are projected to go down to 47 million. this was planned because you had invested over 30 million of that into cash funded capital projects. so that's not a su
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